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We have reached officially reached the next level of evolution of USB connection technology. This development comes after the USB Promoter Group made the official announcement of the new USB 3.2.

The new USB 3.2 comes with one major update from the USB 3.1. It has a multi-lane operation on hosts and devices making it carry twice the bandwidth of current SuperSpeed Type-C cables. Unlike USB 3.1, which had both hosts and devices designed to use a single lane and with SuperSpeed cables designed with multi-lane though the devices they connect to on both ends have not support for it.

With USB 3.2 upcoming certified hosts and devices will have support for multi-lane operations and enable existing cables have twice the speed when connected to them. As it works out, with USB 3.2, a two lane 5Gbps on a USB 3.0 will now support 10Gbps, and a 10Gbps will support 20Gbps.

You should know that the current SuperSpeed USB Type-C you currently have has the capacity for dual-land operations. Perhaps to make thing a bit clearer, the USB Promoter Group says that when a USB 3.2 host is connected to a USB 3.2 storage devices, they can hit speeds of up to 2GB/s using just a regular SuperSpeed certified USB 3.1 cable.

Brad Saunders, the chairman of the USB 3.0 Promoter Group, says, “When we introduced USB Type-C to the market, we intended to assure that USB Type-C cables and connectors certified for SuperSpeed USB or SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps would as produced, support higher performance USB as newer generations of USB 3.0 were developed.”

Why you should take these lightning-fast numbers with a grain of salt

Looking at the supposed data transfer speeds on paper sure looks impressive, even though in reality the performance is annoyingly slower. For instance, The Wirecutter found out that a USB 3.0 flash drive, the Extreme CZ80, had the read and write speed of 254MB/s and 170MB/s respectively.

That is hardly half of what USB Promoter Group says USB 3.0 is capable of transmitting. Nonetheless, the USB 3.2 specs are still not yet ready for commercial roll out. That said, you should not expect to see any device fitted with this technology anytime soon until USB Promoter Group are ready to roll it out. But you can count to get more news about it at this year’s USB Developers Day in September.

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