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Fallon Wilson, Ph.D., came from a humble background having been brought up in the inner-city of Houston. Judging from her journey, it is clear to see Wilson wanted something different for herself. She has had a successful education career accumulating several degrees over years from well reputed institutions such as the Spellman, and University of Chicago. She also has a high school valedictorian to her name.

After completing her education career, Wilson felt she needs to do more to give back to the society she came from. As you can clear see, there is a huge underrepresentation of black community within the tech space. Wilson made it her mission to empower the black community with an ecosystem that will drive the youth to pursue STEM education and later on qualify for a career in tech space.

Wilson zeroed in on Nashville and created the Black in Tech Nashville, where she helps people of color develop tech skills.

If I had to say the thread that connects all of the cities of work I care about, it’s always about creating spaces for people like me and the spaces I’ve had to be able to create new worlds. I think it’s time for us to lay the foundation in Nashville for people of color to really begin developing the mindsets, the skills, and the networks to really grow a tech economy,” Wilson told WKRN.

Wilson says that within a span of 10 months, Back in Tech Nashville registered at least 350 members and just recently, they hosted their first city-wide forum on tech inclusion. The event was held at the Belmont University in August, 2017.

According to WKRN, Back in Tech Nashville has also been nominated for the Nashville Technology Council award. Members of the award include black technologists, business owners, entrepreneurs, educators in K through 12 and higher, creatives, and faith leaders.

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