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It is now a little over two weeks since Microsoft officially released the Windows 10 Creators Update, the successor of its second major update, the Windows 10 Anniversary Update. You would expect Microsoft to have ironed out all the issues while on the beta stage before releasing it on the stable channel.

But no! It appears Windows 10 Creators Update has some buggy issues with some devices, and it seems Microsoft is just learning about it too. This development has prompted Microsoft to issue out a warning to users whose devices are yet to get the update automatically, not to upgrade their Windows 10 manually.

Microsoft without mincing any words says you should wait until the Creators Update rolls onto your devices automatically. Do not manually install the update, unless you are an advanced-level use who can find your way through some of the issues being reported.

So what’s wrong with the Creators Update?

Microsoft reiterates that the Creators Update is intended to roll out in phases, with newer devices being on the first line to get the update automatically. After they get feedback from these devices and sorting out any possible bugs, Microsoft will roll out the update to more devices.

Well, that was the plan Microsoft had, but in reality, however, people (some with older devices not likely to handle the update better) have been going online and manually updating their Windows 10. The feedback Microsoft is getting from some of these older devices is that some machines with a particular series of Broadcom radios are having Bluetooth connectivity issues.

This development has prompted Microsoft to blocked devices with certain Broadcom radios from receiving the update automatically. However, despite the fact that Microsoft has placed these devices on the block list, if a user with such a device updates manually, they will by-pass all the block mechanisms set by Microsoft.

Microsoft is, therefore, discouraging users from manually updating to the Creators Update until they address the Broadcom radios Bluetooth connectivity issues and any other bugs. In a blog post, John Cable, the Director of Program Management at Windows Servicing and Delivery says:

“Blocking availability of the update to devices we know will experience issues is a key aspect of our controlled rollout approach. We decide what to block based on user impact, and blocking issues are a high priority for us to address as quickly as possible. During the time it takes to address an issue, we want to limit the number of customers exposed to that issue.

It’s important to note that when customers use the Software Download Site to manually install the Creators Update, they bypass many of these blocks. Therefore, we continue to recommend (unless you’re an advanced user who is prepared to work through some issues) that you wait until the Windows 10 Creators Update is automatically offered to you. When your device becomes eligible for the Creators Update rollout, you’ll be prompted to make some important choices on your privacy settings before the Creators Update can install.”

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