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HTTP2 Era is Upon Us: Everything You Need to Know About Latest Internet Protocol

The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) has played a great role for web data communication since 1999. It was a cornerstone of application layer protocol used in computer networking. It possesses versatile features for making your web-surfing experience secure and effective. However, with the advancement of digital technology, there has to be some innovation in this sixteen year old protocol. Indeed, Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has recently launched the first major update of HTTP as HTTP2. It is currently under editing process by IETF and will soon be released as Web standard protocol.

Limitations of HTTP

When you surf web pages, HTTP helps you in the background for requesting your desired page from its source. However, modern web pages are quite powerful and contain plenty of features that are not supported by simple HTTP. You would require many HTTP for browsing a single webpage, and hence, slowing down the surfing experience. It is time for making a major update to the regular HTTP.

Background of HTTP 2

HTTP 2 finds its roots in the SPDY protocol that was introduced by Google for its Chrome browser as an application layer protocol. The Chrome developers have been working with IETF ever since the creation of SPDY. Now, Google has removed support for SPDY since HTTP 2 is fully functional now.

New Features of HTTP2

The most important feature of HTTP2 is that the webpages will load faster than ever before. It provides a great multiplexing feature that can deliver more than one HTTP at a time. With the help of HTTP2, the developers don’t need to create complex algorithms for optimizing their website for fast browsing by the users. HTTP2 is inherently designed for multiple HTTP requests and provides ease to web developers.

The developers can test the implementations of HTTP2, but general users will have to wait for some time for the final launch. It is expected that HTTP will still remain effective for considerable amount of time before it is completely discarded.

 

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